An English Teacher's Toolbox

An English teacher at a Secondary School in the UK. * Sharing and questioning the day job. * I teach KS3/4/5.
* Looking for inspiration and motivation, to share with others. * Looking to constantly improve and grow. * On Twitter at @MissBex_M *
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girlwithalessonplan:

Marooned with a grudge and a daughter.  

Good advice

(via pertinaciousheart)

Reblogged from createinnovateexplore:

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The Creative Process

Reflecting on my own practice has led me to consider what it is to be a creative practitioner, and the impact this might have on my learners. I’ve become PowerPoint adverse and in the last few…

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Doing this with Shakespeare next week! #Pedagoo #ukedchat #blackout

newspaperblackout:

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The Kansas City Star is running a blackout poetry contest and wrote up some good tips for making your own poems, many of them from Newspaper Blackout. I thought I’d share some of them here, along with my own notes. New poems coming tomorrow! —AK

Use the newspaper.

LOL. I wanna do this… #ukedchat #engchat

teachingliteracy:

gjmueller:

Teacher’s Most Powerful Tool: Piquing Students’ Curiosity

Ramsey Musallam, a high school chemistry teacher from the San Francisco Bay Area, has been creatively using digital tools in his classroom for several years as a way to drive students to deeper inquiry. In a recent TED talk, Musallam says that a teacher’s strongest tool — the force that draws students deeper into learning — is piquing students’ curiosity. In his classroom, Musallam follows three rules: curiosity comes first, embrace the mess, and reflect and revise.

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Recently, I was reading an article in May’s edition of 'Report' Magazine. The article, 'Conservation up for debate' inspired me, and ignited a need to explore and question the need to teach Speaking and Listening skills, explicitly, within the curriculum.

The article was penned by TV presenter Michaela Strachan, and although her passion for conservation is admirable, it was her comments on the application of ‘debate in the classroom’ that really caught my eye.

Strachan referenced the well-known Chinese proverb: “Tell me and I’ll forget, show me and I may remember, involve me and I’ll understand” to support her ideas about conservation and debate being taught in the classroom.

However, to me it emphasised the need to model and practice the art of debating from an early age - in the same way we model and practice essay writing. This stronger focus on debating is relevant to the current KS3 and KS4 curriculum and examinations I’m delivering. In the article, Strachan states that 'every opinion needs debating', and that although relying on emotion and passion can mean for enjoyable experiences - it isn’t enough. Instead, it is far better to 'involve the kids by getting them to debate issues' and to 'get them researching the facts themselves and have a class debate'. Strachan’s insistence got me thinking…

With Speaking and Listening’s value currently hanging by a thread for KS4, from the Government’s point of view, I began thinking about how to explore debating at KS3. I completely agree with Strachan’s view that ‘when telling an audience about an emotionally charged subject, it is only fair to give both sides a voice’. We deliver this repeatedly when teaching pupils the skill of writing ‘to argue’ - but I think when doing speaking and listening I am guilty of focusing on purposes to inform and persuade, neglecting the need to teach pupils to verbally articulate balanced responses.

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So, on reflection I asked myself: What can I do to change this?

One of the key preparations is to create a safe environment in which pupils can take risks, with confidence, and this can often be done in collaboration with the students - encouraging them to decide on the rules to create the right climate for learning.

Another change can be focusing on the importance of creating relevant, skills focused success criteria that are used consistently across the department (and school). In his excellent book “(2012) The Perfect Ofsted English Lesson”, David Didau details the importance of clear success criteria. I’m already a big fan of the s.c. and I include it in all independent tasks, but Didau succinctly explains that 'without them [success criteria] students will struggle to do what you want' and that the success criteria 'tells them how'. Didau builds on this saying that 'ideally, what we want are success criteria which move students from surface to deep understanding'.

Therefore, I believe that it is through modelling; deconstructing live examples; creating a safe environment, and clear success criteria that we can deliver the concept of debating effectively, and encourage students to apply these skills themselves.

How have you successfully taught debating? What strategies and activities have you employed?

Things to do with your English degree… awesome ;) #ukedchat