An English Teacher's Toolbox

An English teacher at a Secondary School in the UK. * Sharing and questioning the day job. * I teach KS3/4/5.
* Looking for inspiration and motivation, to share with others. * Looking to constantly improve and grow. * On Twitter at @MissBex_M *
Recent Tweets @
Posts I Like
Who I Follow
Posts tagged "Social media"

Details: “This advert for the Guardian’s open journalism, screened for the first time on 29 February 2012, imagines how we might cover the story of the Three Little Pigs in print and online. Follow the story from the paper’s front page headline, through a social media discussion and finally to an unexpected conclusion.”

How could we use it? This would be brilliant when exploring media and non-fiction, as well as the growing nature of social networks. - creative writing, debate, discussion, projects etc.

thedogatemylessonplan:

Schools are becoming more and more technology oriented each day. At times, it seems that the ability of working with the lastest gadgets, computer software and social networking sites comes naturally to children. Meanwhile, adults struggle just to keep up. Since social networking has…

world-shaker:

Here’s one idea:

Discussions in character

An effective way to use Twitter is to have students tweet in character. Let’s look at a specific example based upon Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Divide your class into groups of about five students each and have a Romeo and Juliet tweetup. Assign each group a unique hashtag (i.e. #chsenglit11 for CHS English Literature Period 1 Group 1). If you are using TodaysMeet, create a separate room for each group. Then assign each student a character from the play. Each group will be assigned the same set of characters. In our example, you will now have several groups with a Romeo, a Juliet, a Mercutio, etc. For the assignment, have the students tweet in character about important parts of the play or even tweet new scenes. A directive might be, “Tweet your character’s thoughts immediately after Juliet’s wedding gets moved to the next morning (before she drinks the poison.)” Make sure they tweet in the Shakespearean writing style! This assignment could be a one-time event or a continuous assignment throughout the entire unit of study.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

As social media become almost inescapable on college campuses, a pair of recently published studies supports what many professors already have concluded: Students using Facebook or text messaging during a lecture tend to do worse when quizzed later.

But wait: Faculty who build Twitter into…